The 26th Annual Okinawan Festival is here!

The 26th Annual Okinawan Festival is here!

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Just a little reminder to everyone out there that this weekend is the 26th Annual Okinawan Festival at Kapiolani Park. The event is visited by thousands and is always a good time for the whole family. We’ve included all the information that you need to know about the festival and to plan out your Labor Day weekend. Be safe everyone!

26TH OKINAWAN FESTIVAL — “SHARING UCHINANCHU ALOHA”
The Facts

WHAT: 26th Okinawan Festival

WHEN: Saturday, Aug. 30, 8:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 31, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

WHERE: Kapi‘olani Park Bandstand

WHO: Sponsored by the Hawaii United Okinawa Association

WHY: Celebrate, perpetuate and share the Okinawan culture with the local community and visitors to Hawai‘i. Proceeds from the festival fund HUOA’s cultural programs.

OKINAWAN FESTIVAL SHUTTLE BUS
• Park free at Kapi‘olani Community College.
• Shuttle stations: at Kapi‘olani Community College: Waikïkï end, near Diamond Head Road; at Kapi‘olani Park: Monsarrat Avenue.
• Shuttle runs continuous during the festival; $1 for round-trip ride.
• Saturday hours: 7 a.m.-10:30 p.m. (Last departure from Kapi‘olani Park at 10:30 p.m.)
• Sunday hours: 8 a.m.- 6 p.m. (Last departure from Kapi‘olani Park at 6 p.m.)
• Bus has a storage compartment for baby strollers, lawn chairs and large bags.

ENTERTAINMENT
• Continuous live entertainment on the Kapi‘olani Park Bandstand stage from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., both days (see program schedule below).

FESTIVAL FOOD
• 11 food booths serving everything from andagi to okidogs to laulau plates and pig’s feet soup (see full menu below).

CULTURAL TENT
• It’s the best primer to Okinawan culture. Increase your knowledge by purchasing Hui O Laulima’s new culture/cookbook at a special presale price (see pg. 10 for more information).

SATURDAY NOTES
• Children’s Games closes at 5 p.m.; most food booths and tents close at 6 p.m.
• All welcome to join the festival bon dance in the open area adjacent to the Bandstand from 5-9:30 p.m.
• Okinawa Soba and Andagi booths will remain open until 8 p.m. to feed hungry bon dancers.
• Last shuttle bus from Kapi‘olani Park to Kapi‘olani Community College at 10:30 p.m. Plan wisely: If you miss the bus, it’s a long hike up to KCC in the dark.

SUNDAY NOTES
• Craft Gallery and Children’s Games closes at 4:30 p.m.
• Last shuttle leaves Kapi‘olani Park for Kapi‘olani Community College at 6 p.m.

CHILDREN’S GAMES
• 11 activities for kids, including the popular Andagi Dunk; prizes for some games and make-n-take crafts.
• 8 inflatables.

COUNTRY STORE — aka “Machiya-gwa”
• Limited supply of locally made andamisu (miso and pork condiment) that will knock your socks off when eaten with hot rice. When it’s gone, it’s gone . . .
• Fresh Island produce.

PLANT BOOTH — aka “Hanagi Machiya-gwa”
• Plants galore for Green Thumbs and aspiring Green Thumbs!

HEIWA DORI
• Okinawan food products that you can make at home — the next best thing to Okinawa’s Heiwa Dori.

ART-CRAFT GALLERY — aka “Ti Jukuishina-Mishimun”
• Love shopping for wearable art and other crafty items? This tent’s for you! And if you run short of cash, keep in mind that a Bank of Hawaii ATM is located near the Monsarrat Avenue comfort station.

COME PREPARED
• Wear a hat and apply sunscreen to protect yourself from the summer sun; bring a mat or big beach towel to sit on.
• Drink lots of WATER to keep yourself hydrated and make regular trips to the bathroom.
• If you’re not feeling well or injure yourself, ask volunteers for assistance or go directly to the First Aid Tent behind the Bandstand stage. Medical professionals will be on-hand to assist you.

OKINAWAN FESTIVAL PHOTO CONTEST
• Sponsored by the HUOA to gather and archive photos documenting this year’s festival
• Three theme areas: “Food,” “‘Ohana” and “Culture and History”
• A total of seven prizes to be awarded: a first and second place in each of the three theme areas, plus the vest overall photo which wins the $100 grand prize
• Photo deadline: postmarked by Sept. 8 if sent by U.S. Postal Service; mail to: Okinawan Festival Photo Contest, HUOA, 94-587 Ukee St., Waipahu, HI 96797; Sept. 10 if sent by e-mailed to: photocontest@huoa.org

HISTORY:
• First festival: 1982 at McCoy Pavilion, Ala Moana Park
• 1985: Okinawan Festival moves to Thomas Square and the Honolulu Academy of Arts
• 1990: Festival has outgrown Thomas Square and moves to Kapi‘olani Park to attract a larger, broader and more ethnically diverse audience

DID YOU KNOW . . .
• . . . That the only year a festival was not held was 1989? HUOA officials and volunteers used the year to plan and organize the quantum leap move to Kapi‘olani Park.
• . . .That the Okinawan Festival is organized and run by an army of over 2,000 volunteers from the HUOA’s 48 member-clubs and their extended ‘ohana of Uchinanchu and Uchinanchu-at-heart?
• . . . That during the two-day festival, volunteers will cook up over 112,000 andagi? Holy andagi, Batman!

QUESTIONS?
Visit the festival Web site, http://www.OkinawanFestival.com, e-mail: info@okinawanfestival.com or call the Hawaii United Okinawa Association at (808) 676-5400.

2008 PROGRAM

“SHARING UCHINANCHU ALOHA” IN MUSIC AND DANCE

SATURDAY, AUG. 30

8:35 a.m. RYUKYU SOKYOKU KOYO KAI HAWAII SHIBU
Yasuko Arakawa, Chapter President

9:05 a.m. KILAUEA OKINAWA DANCE CLUB
Toshiko Neumann, Leader

9:35 a.m. TBA

10 a.m. OPENING PROCESSION OF HAWAII UNITED OKINAWA ASSOCIATION CLUB BANNERS
Also, Shishimai (lion dance); Chondara (Okinawan clown) and Paranku Clubs of Hawaii

10:35 a.m. URIZUN
Derek Shiroma, Leader

11 a.m. FORMAL OPENING CEREMONIES

11:30 a.m. CELEBRITY KACHASHI

Noon RADIO OKINAWA
• Tatsuya Shimabukuro, Radio Okinawa’s Miuta Taisho winner
• Tokonatsu Band

1:35 p.m. ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND
Michael Nakasone, Bandmaster

2:40 p.m. MAMORU MIYAGI

3:15 p.m. RYUKYUKOKU MATSURI DAIKO HAWAII
Akemi Martin, Regional Director

3:40 p.m. JIMPU KAI USA KIN RYOSHO RYUKYU GEINO
Cheryl Yoshie Nakasone-Sensei

4:10 p.m. RYUSEI HONRYU RYUKO KAI — TOGUCHI MITSUKO RYUBU KENKYUSHO
Mitsuko Toguchi Nakasone, Kaishu

4:35 p.m. HAITAI MIYARABI
A group of young women from Okinawa and Hawaii dancing hula to Okinawan music.”

5 p.m. 2008 OKINAWAN FESTIVAL BON DANCE
• Young Okinawans of Hawaii
• Yamada Dance Group
• Iwakuni Odori Aiko Kai
• Aiea Taiheiji Yagura Gumi
• Hawaii Eisa Shinyuu Kai

10:30 p.m. LAST SHUTTLE TO KAPIOLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SUNDAY, AUG. 31
9 a.m. PAUAHI OKINAWA BUYO CLUB
Shigemitsu Kaneshiro, Instructor

9:20 a.m. OKINAWA SHORIN RYU KARATE/SHINDEN RYU KARATE ASSOCIATION
Mitchel Shimamura-Sensei

9:45 a.m. KIKUE KANESHIRO RYUBU KENKYU KAI
Joyce Shimabukuro and Shizuko Shiroma, Leaders

10:10 a.m. TATSUYA YASUDA
SOSAKUDAIKO RYUKYU YUIHANA
Francis Toyama, President

10:50 a.m. HOOGE KAI NAKASONE DANCE ACADEMY
Lynne Yoshiko Nakasone, Grandmaster

11:20 a.m. SHINSATO SHOSEI KAI
Katsumi Shinsato-Sensei

11:50 a.m. TAMAGUSUKU RYU SENJUKAI FRANCES NAKACHI RYUBU DOJO
Frances Nakachi, Artistic Director

12:15 p.m. ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND
Michael Nakasone, Bandmaster

1:20 p.m. HUOA SANSHIN CLASS & NIDAIME TEISHIN KAI HAWAII SHIBU
Richard Yamashiroya, Chapter President

1:50 p.m. AFUSO RYU GENSEI KAI HAWAII SHIBU
Grant Murata, Chapter President

2:20 p.m. MAJIKINA HONRYU BUYO DOJO
Yoshino Majikina Nakasone-Sensei

2:45 p.m. MAMORU MIYAGI

3:25 p.m. RYUKYU SOKYOKU HOZON KAI HAWAII SHIBU-SARINA SOKYOKU KENKYUSHO
Sarina Udd-Sensei

3:55 p.m. HUI OKINAWA KOBUDO TAIKO from Hilo, Hawaii
Troy Sakihara, Leader

6 p.m. LAST SHUTTLE TO KAPIOLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE

CULTURAL TENT

IMMERSE YOURSELF IN THE OKINAWAN CULTURE

The Hui O Laulima women’s group is once again spearheading activities in the Festival’s Cultural Tent. Make sure you spend some time soaking up other aspects of Okinawan culture.

NEW THIS YEAR . . .
• Hot off the press, Hui O Laulima’s new culture/cookbook, “Chimugukuru: The Soul, The Spirit, The Heart/Okinawan Mixed Plate II: Generous Servings of Culture, Customs and Cuisine,” will be available for purchase in the Cultural Tent for $23. (See Gwen Battad Ishikawa’s story on Page ___ for more information on the book). Preordered books can also be picked up, but you must present your receipt in order to redeem your book.

• Jay Iwanaga will demonstrate the art of taiko-making; also check out his taiko exhibit.

ALSO IN THE CULTURAL TENT . . .
• Uchinäguchi (Okinawan language): “Haisai! (Howzit!).” “Mensoree! (Welcome!)” Laminated bookmarks featuring popular Okinawan words and phrases will be available for purchase so that you can continue to practice the new words you learned.

• Okinawan artifacts: Okinawa’s unique ceramics, glassware, lacquerware and textiles will be on display.

• Dressing and Picture-taking: If you’re looking for the perfect photo for your family’s Holiday card, here’s a great idea. Get dressed up as a paranku drummer and/or in a traditional bingata kimono with a hanagasa headpiece and have a professional photo taken by David Shimabukuro of One Moment In Time Photography. Dress-up and picture-taking times are Saturday and Sunday, 9 to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.
Cost: 8” x 10” color photo: starting at $25 (photos can be paid for with either cash or scrips). (???)

• Okinawan Genealogical Society of Hawaii members will provide information on how you can trace your genealogy. They ask that you come prepared with your family’s kanji.

• Calligraphy display and demonstration: Calligraphy writing of your family name will be available for purchase.

• Photo display of children participating in Okinawan cultural activities at the Hawaii United Okinawa Association’s Children’s Day Camp.

• Display of bonsai and silent auction of bonsai plants by the Hawaii Bonsai Association.

• Hands-on activities for children provided by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i.

COME PREPARED TO GRIND

Some people love the Okinawan Festival because of the music and colorful dances; others are drawn to the Cultural Tent. But everyone comes to eat! Andagi . . . Champuru . . . Andamisu . . . Tumai kuru . . . Ashitibichi — it’s Okinawan “comfort food” — and downright mäsan (Okinawan for ‘ono!). Make sure you sample everything at this year’s Okinawan Festival . . . starting with everyone’s favorite: andagi!
*Note: Food booth hours are 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. (except for Okinawa Soba and Andagi, due to the bon dance) on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

• Andagi: The andagi, or Okinawan doughnut, is the Festival’s No. 1 favorite. Basic doughnut ingredients — sugar, flour, milk and eggs — are mixed into a batter and deep-fried in hot oil. The hand “dropping” of evenly rounded scoops of batter into the hot oil is a show in itself. Three andagi per package.

• Andadog: Andagi and hotdog all in one! The Andadog is the Okinawan version of the corndog. Half a hotdog on a stick is dipped into andagi batter and deep fried.

• Pig’s Feet Soup: It’s called ashitibichi or tibichi in Uchinaaguchi (Okinawan language). Chunks of pig’s feet are cooked in a delicious soup stock, garnished with konbu (seaweed), daikon (radish), togan (squash) and mustard cabbage and served with rice. Mmmmmm . . . ‘ono! — even on a hot summer day!

• Okinawa Soba: Okinawa-style soba noodles served in hot soup and garnished with kamaboko (fishcake), shoyu pork, green onions and red ginger.

• Yaki Soba: Okinawa-style soba noodles stir-fried in huge woks with vegetables and luncheon meat and seasoned with a special sauce.

• Champuru Plate: If you love Okinawan food, you’ll love this very healthy Okinawan plate prepared champuru style — a stir-fried mixture of vegetables, luncheon meat and agedofu (deep-fried tofu) — served with a delicious slice of shoyu pork, a teaspoon of andamisu (pork and miso mixture) and rice.

• Okidog: A hotdog and chili are wrapped in a soft tortilla with shredded shoyu pork and lettuce.

• Chili Choices: Enjoy a plate of chili with a hotdog on rice, or just a bowl of chili and rice.

• Laulau Plate: Laulau with rice and lomi lomi salmon.

• Chicken Plate: Barbecue chicken prepared local style and served with rice and corn, or just chicken in a carry-out bag.

• Tumai Kuru: Tumai kuru is the purple sweet potato that found its way to Hawaii from China by way of Okinawa. In Okinawa, it was a staple food that sustained the people through good times and bad. During Okinawa’s harsh typhoons, the potato remained protected underground. The tumai kuru served at the Festival will be steamed, making for a healthy snack.

• Maki sushi: Sushi rolled in nori (seaweed) and sliced for easy eating.

• Shave Ice: The perfect way to cool down on a hot summer day.

• Beverages:
Canned juice
Chilled bottled soda, iced tea and water
Coffee

SATURDAY NIGHT BON DANCE GRINDS
The Okinawa Soba and Andagi booths will remain open until 8 p.m., serving:
• Okinawa Soba
• Andagi
• Maki sushi
• Chilled bottled water, soda and iced tea

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